Fury Movie Review

Every once and awhile a war movie comes out that stands out among the pack. When I was a little younger that movie was Saving Private Ryan. This cameo laden war story was the most realistic and brutal look at warfare I had ever seen. It left a strong impression on me and made me appreciate the men and women who fought for our freedom. Since that time, many more war movies have come out, and though I’ve enjoyed them, none have quite measured up. Until Fury.

Fury follows WWII tank Sgt. Don “Wardaddy” Collier (Brad Pitt) as he travel’s the German countryside in a M-4 Sherman class tank. Manned by a crew of misfits that ride the line between lovable and reprehensible, they push through the dangerous German countryside. From the moment you meet these guys you feel the history between them. John Beranthal (The Walking Dead) plays Grady Travis, a foul-mouthed country boy who acts as engineer and aids the cannoneer. Shia Le Beoff (Transformers), an actor I don’t normally like, plays Boyd “Bible” Swan, a Bible-believing baptist man and cannoneer. Though just as foul mouthed as the rest of them, he felt like a real man of faith in a terrible circumstance. Michael Pena (Last Watch, Gracepoint) was Trini ‘Gordo’ Garcia, the bow gunner of the Fury along with newcomer Norman Ellison played by Logan Lerman (Percy Jackson). Extremely well-acted, Fury shines by showing the grey area that men in brutal combat live in. “Ideals are peaceful, history is violent,” says Collier.

There are no easy answers in Fury. There is no clear right and wrong. At times, the heroes seem more like villains. A life of terrible violence has caused good men to become violent shells of their former selves. It is this moral grey area the movie lives in that is both compelling and distressing.

Together, with the exception of newcomer Normal, the crew of the Fury have fought through North Africa, Italy, Normandy and now Germany. “This is my home,” says Collier, referring to the Fury. Normally being master of your own domain means no more than you know how to setup all the technology and fix the plumbing. For Collier, it means the promise to “keep my men alive.” A master tactician, Collier brings his crews into some of the most white-knuckled, edge-of-my-seat tank battles that I have ever seen. Outgunned and outnumbered, their crew pushes through the deadly German landscape. The addition of tracer bullets to heavy gun fire gave the battle scenes a kinetic energy unmatched in any battle scene in recent memory. In some of the most brutally realistic battle scenes since Saving Private Ryan we see ideals shattered, soft men become battle hardened and a lot of Nazi’s fall.

I’ve been waiting for Fury for months now and that wait has paid off. Though the story is your standard, one group against an entire army scenario, the fantastic cast and dialogue make it incredibly interesting. It’s gritty, brutal and realistic view of war is in no way celebratory. War is not something to be desired but a necessity in a fallen world full of evil. Edmund Burke said it well when he stated “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” Though war has surely made good men do terrible things and broken their spirits in the process, we can be thankful there are people willing to do that to stand up to the evil of this world.

Because of the intensity of the violence and vulgarity of language Fury may not be for everyone. If you’re teen wants to see this, it might be good to go with them, due to the unrelenting language and violence. Please check the links below for a full content breakdown. Are you going to see Fury? Let us know what you think when you do!

Bryce Cooley
I've been doing some form of ministry since 2000. For 13 years I was involved in the youth ministry at Cordova Neighborhood Church as everything from youth intern to youth pastor. God has led me and my lovely wife Bethany to Church of the Foothills where I currently reside as the Digital Publishing Coordinator. I'm excited to see where God leads my wife and I.
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Bryce Cooley
I've been doing some form of ministry since 2000. For 13 years I was involved in the youth ministry at Cordova Neighborhood Church as everything from youth intern to youth pastor. God has led me and my lovely wife Bethany to Church of the Foothills where I currently reside as the Digital Publishing Coordinator. I'm excited to see where God leads my wife and I.