Telos

Forevermore released their debut record Telos on Solid State Records this week, and it is undeniably one of the most innovative releases of 2014.

The opening track “Force Fed” establishes the band’s signature sound, thus setting the tone for the rest of the album. Musicians Jared Storm (Guitar), Alex Smith (Guitar), Michael Taylor (Bass/Vocals), and Sammy Vaughn (Drums) really pull off something special with this release. The guitars on Telos often combine elements of djent metal, metalcore, and hardcore, which works for them in a truly unique way. Some guitar riffs remind me of Volumes, others of August Burns Red and Texas In July. There’s even a guitar lick in “Lackluster” that gives off a Maylene and the Sons of Disaster vide. I bring up these parallels just to show how diverse Forevermore can be, while also remaining true to the sound they’ve developed with this record.

Lyrically, Kramer Lowe attempts to bring to light some of the most important topics in today’s society and challenges you to question your fundamental beliefs. Here’s a brief explanation from Jared Storm about the writing process:

On a deeper level, it raises the question of whether one’s life does indeed have any ultimate purpose or significance; a question for which the answer is largely dependent on one’s fundamental worldview or beliefs about ultimate reality. The concept that the word ‘Telos’ encapsulates should prompt us to consider the implications that our fundamental worldview has on these questions about life’s ultimate purpose, and to reflect on how they should influence the way we live our lives.

The single from the album “Force Fed” is a prime example of that concept, and speaks of the choice that we have to combat a ‘force-fed’ complacency.

Tell me all the things you’ve done because you were force fed
It’s your choice to lose your state of mind / Your own free will

What’s most interesting about this debut is the use of electronically added notes in the background, behind the music. These additions often carry the melody throughout the record, and they affirm Forevermore’s innovative creation. That, coupled with their djent-like rhythms and guitar leads, shows there aren’t many dull moments on Telos. The drums are also specific to the Forevermore sound, often sounding off-beat and abnormal. To get a sense of what I’m getting at you can watch Sammy Vaughn play through “Force Fed” on this video.

Though there are many positives about this release, there is always some room for improvement. It feels like this album is missing a “final piece” from being truly great. To some, the songs may blend into one another creating a sense of monotony. In my opinion, the clean vocals throughout Telos just didn’t do it for me. Though the times they did come up sounded organic, the execution just wasn’t up to par with the rest of the album.

The album name Telos is Greek for “purpose, end, or goal,” and I feel that Forevermore reaches theirs with this record. From the ashes of previous endeavors, Kramer Lowe (vocals, ex-Onward to Olympas) and the rest of Forevermore clearly show their promise and potential. I couldn’t possibly put into words the “sound” that these guys have created. It is something that needs to be experienced firsthand.

Download Telos on iTunes for only $7.99!

Anthony Ibarra
I'm Anthony, and I am a writer for ChristCore.net. I live in Austin, TX where I study at the University of Texas. I am an extreme music enthusiast, and love to share my passion for music with others.
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Anthony Ibarra
I'm Anthony, and I am a writer for ChristCore.net. I live in Austin, TX where I study at the University of Texas. I am an extreme music enthusiast, and love to share my passion for music with others.